Dino Rosin



Dino Rosin

Bowl, c. 2000's
Calcedonia Glass
8.37 x 16.75 x 10.50 in
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Large bowl in transparent and chalcedony glass by Dino Rosin, Murano, 2000s.
Applied pad mark, signed.
H. 8.375 x L. 16.75 x D. 10.5
Excellent Vintage Condition.
 



Dino Rosin was born in Venice May 30, 1948. His family moved to the glass making island of Murano when he was two months old. At the age of twelve he left school and began working as an apprentice at the Barovier and Toso glassworks. He joined his brothers, Loredano and Mirko, at their factory in 1963. In 1975 his brother Loredano established his own studio and Dino became his assistant. He was Loredano’s right hand in the “piazza” and a master in his own right in cold work. In 1988, Dino was invited to the Pilchuck Glass School in the state of Washington in the U.S. to teach solid, free-hand glass sculpture with Loredano and the American glass artist, William Morris. Examples of his skill at cutting and finishing large glass sculptures have been exhibited in all of Rosin’s shows. His work has also been displayed at the Museo Dell’arte Vetrariain Murano. Calcedonia glass is both one of the oldest and one of the most rare types of glass. It was first developed on Murano during the mid-fifteenth century and is generally attributed to the master Angelo Barovier, whose firm was producing items in Calcedonia in 1460. For 500 years the mystery of Calcedonia glass has fascinated the world. Items made in Calcedonia glass are among the most treasured holdings of the famous museums. Although Antonio Neri devoted twelve full pages to the description of this glass in his 1612 treatise, “L’arte Vetraia,” the uncertainties and difficulties of its production were resolved only by the masters of Murano and lost again with the fall of the Venetian Republic. The secret of the production of Calcedonia glass was finally rediscovered in 1856 but lost again by the turn of the century. In 1977, the Rosins again achieved the miracle of Calcedonia. They then began using this ancient and historical glass to produce hand-made sculptures of modern style and design. Calcedonia, as its name implies, is a type of glass that echoes the multi-colored striations of the zoned agate. Unlike many other types of glass that imitate semiprecious stones, it is not created by mixing together two or more colors of glass. The colors, shades and markings of the mysterious Calcedonia result from a chemical process intrinsic to each batch of glass; a reaction based on the effect of the metal silver on the other minerals and substances used to make glass. Each pot of Calcedonia requires two kilos of silver nitrate to achieve the subtle beauty characteristic of this glass. Even today the production of Calcedonia is an expensive and unpredictable process, more akin to alchemy than to chemistry. While the action of silver on the other materials generally results in a blend of colors—browns, greens and a hint of blue—the exact shades and degree of striation cannot be controlled and vary from day to day and item to item. Each piece is a unique and unrepeatable work of art combining an ancient technical process with the best of modern craftsmanship and talent. Combining transparent and Calcedonia glass, Dino has created sculptures of ephemeral beauty. By exposing internal form through transparency and empty space, these sculptures unveil the tension and movement of the glass itself. The rainbow hues of Calcedonia glass are like waves or whirlpools, fixed, but liquid still. Together the two types of glass give these works a lightness and clarity that is almost spiritual in the fusion of fire, water, rock and air. The limpid glory of each piece demonstrates the mystical breath of creation animating in the infinite variety of the natural world. When his brother Loredano was killed in a boating accident, Dino Rosin carried on the family tradition and has become the “Master”. He has been invited to teach at the Corning Glass School in Corning, NY and the prestigious Pilchuck Glass School in Washington. His work is exhibited and collected worldwide. 600 Fifth Avenue South, Naples, FL 34102 914 East Las Olas, Ft Lauderdale, Fl 33301 (239) 435-4515 (954) 524-2100 www.newriverfineart.com New River Gallery 1016 East Las Olas Boulevard, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301 (954) 524-2100 --- www.newrivergallery.com Dino Rosin was born in Venice in 1948 and grew up on the glass making island of Murano. At age 12 he began working as an apprentice learning the secrets of Murano glass making. He later joined his brothers and worked his way to becoming a Master. In 1988, Dino was invited to the Pilchuck Glass School in the state of Washington in the U.S. to teach solid, free-hand glass sculpture with Loredano and the American glass artist, William Morris. Examples of his skill at cutting and finishing large glass sculptures have been exhibited in all of Rosin’s shows. His work has also been displayed at the Museo Dell’arte Vetrariain Murano. Calcedonia glass is both one of the oldest and one of the most rare types of glass. For 500 years the mystery of Calcedonia glass has fascinated the world. Items made in Calcedonia glass are among the most treasured holdings of the famous museums. The secret of the production of Calcedonia glass was finally rediscovered in 1856 but lost again by the turn of the century. In 1977, the Rosins again achieved the miracle of Calcedonia. Combining transparent and Calcedonia glass, Dino Rosin creates sculptures of ephemeral beauty. The limpid glory of each piece demonstrates the mystical breath of creation.. When his brother Loredano was killed in a boating accident, Dino Rosin carried on the family tradition and has become the “Master”. He has been invited to teach at the Corning Glass School in Corning, NY and the prestigious Pilchuck Glass School in Washington. His work is exhibited and collected worldwide. For more information, please contact New River Fine Art 914 East Las Olas Boulevard Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301 954-524-2100 www.newriverfineart.com

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822 E Las Olas Blvd
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301
USA
822 E Las Olas Blvd
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301
USA
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